Our House  

JCP 40

I had planned an industry-specific message for my blog this week, but tragedy struck the Joseph Chris Partners family this weekend, and I wanted to share my feelings about all of it

At 5 a.m. Saturday morning, my phone rang.  I knew something was wrong, but nothing prepared me for what I would hear when I answered that call:  through her sobs, one of my long-time JCP team members shared with shock and sadness that she’d just lost her husband.

My heart sank for her.  This employee has been with our company for over a decade. I have heard so many stories about her children’s successes, her worries, her life situations and just every-day stuff that you learn about someone working with them for as long as we’ve worked together.  She gives her all every day to make sure she does what she can to make our team successful.  She can’t sit still and is vigilant about getting the job done right, whatever that job might be.  If you need anything, she is there for you, no matter how many other responsibilities she may be juggling at the time.

She is more than just an employee; she is my family.

And I quickly realized I wasn’t the only one who felt that way about her.  After hearing the tragic news, the JCP army mobilized to help her and her own family.  Within hours, we had collected money, food, and cards filled with love to deliver to her.  Joseph Chris Partners’ reaction spoke volumes to me about the power of team.

When a situation like this happens in our house, we take action.  We not only had an outpouring of love but we also had an outpouring of support from the team.  Everyone from the most tenured in our company to the newest member of the team has rallied, volunteering to give up their vacation time so she didn’t have to worry about returning to work before she was ready, donating money and buying groceries even when they had their own financial stresses, making time for her even when time was scarce, and offering emotional support and counsel.

She is family!  She is one of us! We take care of our own! It reminded me how blessed I am to have such an incredible team.    We have togetherness.  We are family, we have unity.  We get in the trenches for one another.  Humanity… Love!  The old sayings that “no one messes with our family” and “no one stands alone” really does exude in our company.

I am so grateful to work with a group that is there for one another.

Just to be a little real and open with all of you, I do not have kids, but I have been blessed with an amazing family:  my parents, my brother’s family, my four-legged family members, and my team mean everything to me.  They are my reason each and every day that I am on a mission to perform at my best.  I wake up thinking about them, and they are in my prayers each night.

Like most bosses, I may not do everything right all the time and I could be a better leader at times, but I will stand for them always like a deep-rooted tree that will not move in the worst of bad weather.   Hopefully they know that they are part of a work family that will always be here for them.

I talk to people every day about their jobs.  I learn about what makes them happy, what keeps them in a job or what drives them to leave.  And one of the biggest influences on their happiness is whether or not they feel like they’re part of a team, whether they matter, whether the people they work with appreciate them.

And with each of those conversations, I feel more and more blessed to be working with such amazing people who care so much for each other.  And I know because we have that, we can all accomplish anything, together.

That’s how it works in our house.

And I couldn’t be prouder.

You Snooze, You Lose: How to streamline your hiring process so you don’t lose out on top talent

blog

I am not a morning person.  My bed is really cozy, and I keep my house nice and cold at night, so when the first of my 4 alarms goes off at 5 a.m., I snooze so I can stay in my warm and cozy bed.  And each of my four alarms is set to snooze 5 times before it stops.  And depending on how cozy I am, I may snooze for an hour, relishing the quiet 5 minutes between alarms, until I finally turn on my morning Spotify mix and start my day.

It’s a silly ritual, I realize, but it’s my morning routine, and one I’m pretty Rainman-esque about.

Until Monday of this week.

I haven’t been going to the gym like I should.  Or at all.  And I’ve always got an excuse.  I usually blame my daughter’s busy schedule, or just being tired from life in general, but the bottom line is, I just don’t want to go.  I want the results from going to the gym, like we all do, without doing the work.

So Monday I changed the paradigm.  I set my alarm for 4:00 a.m.  I didn’t snooze.  I got up, dressed, and out the door for a 5 a.m. class, and was home by 6:20, showered, and at work by my normal time of 7 a.m.

And Monday was an incredibly productive day.  Things just seemed to go my way.  It was probably just coincidence, but I’ve committed to abandoning my snoozing habit on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and getting my morning workout in.  It’ll be my new Rainman-esque routine.

Certainly, snoozing has its benefits, and no one loves it more than I do, but if you really want to get things done personally or professionally, snoozing is not the way to go.

In this candidate-driven job market, clients who hit “snooze” on a hot job search are losing out on great talent.   Some companies are used to being able to select from a myriad of wonderful professionals itching to go to work for them, but the dynamic has changed, as dynamics always do.  The pendulum has shifted once again, and while professionals will still entertain conversations about great opportunities, companies that don’t have an efficient way of moving from initial conversation to offer will likely lose out to those companies that do.

The best way to avoid losing a great addition to your team due to hiring process delays is to do the following:

  1. CREATE A HIRING TIMELINE.
    • Identify when you want this person to start working for your company. Is there are big project that they need to be in place for?  Is someone retiring and time is needed for training before the changing of the guard?
    • Decide who in your company needs to weigh in on this decision, and take inventory of scheduling issues to determine how quickly necessary interviews and pre-hiring testing can take place.
    • Working backward, tentatively schedule necessary meetings with key team members so time is reserved on everyone’s busy calendars for hiring activities.
    • After your hiring timeline is created, you can share it with your hiring partners, either internally or externally.
    • Your talent acquisition partners will then be able to tailor their search efforts to your timeline, as well as be transparent with the professionals they connect with about the process.
  2. BE RESPONSIVE WITH YOUR FEEDBACK.
    • From a branding standpoint, you need to consider the message candidates in market are receiving from the length of time it takes your hiring team to share feedback with them.
    • Commit to provide feedback on candidate resumes, interview performance or other follow up questions during the hiring process within 24-48 hours.
    • If unexpected delays occur, communicate them promptly to candidates and/or your talent acquisition partners.
  3. MAKE A FAIR OFFER.
    • It is not the time to try to save a dime on a hire. That’s not to say you should just throw money at people, but you should discuss your offer with your talent acquisition partners to ensure it’s a fair one.
    • The cost of making a lowball offer in today’s candidate centric market is high: not only will you lose the interest of the professional you’re pursuing, you will have lost the time your team invested in the job search when the candidate declines and you have to restart your search, and your brand will suffer if the professionals in your space don’t think you appreciate the value of what your team members bring to the table.
    • Listen to experts in the industry about what it takes today to get the type of talent you really need to grow your business.

There are a lot of companies competing for the same talent in our industry right now, and while the hiring process alone will not guarantee that your company will win every head-to-head battle for talent, those companies committed to efficiency and transparency in their talent searches will win over the ones who aren’t.

If your company needs help restructuring your hiring process or connecting with the right professionals to add to your team, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us here at Joseph Chris Partners.

Technology has Changed, but Good Recruiters Still Focus on the Basics: Advice From My 15 Years in Executive Recruiting

Claire2

When I started recruiting in 2002, you could call it a “whole other world” compared to recruiting today. And I honestly believe the skills that I learned back then made, and have kept, me successful all these years.

Back then, there was no LinkedIn, no Google, no Social Media, etc., to speak of. We did have a great database of candidates going back to when the company started in 1977, but other than that, you had to truly dig and hunt for candidates anywhere and everywhere. I spent a lot of time calling companies that were members of certain associations, using Biz Books for every city imaginable to find out who the top companies were in that location and industry, and trust me when I say I made 50 calls every day before noon!

It was truly “hunting” and sourcing from every place imaginable. We even had yellow pages from cities around the country. We faxed all the time and some of us were even still on dial-up internet.

I am grateful that I started before the world of Social Media and LinkedIn came. Personally, I think those things have become too much of a crutch for recruiters. I still apply the old methods today because they work. If everyone could be found on LinkedIn people like my colleagues and me would not be needed.

If I could give advice to any new recruiter today, it would be:

• Stay on the phone, use social media and LinkedIn only as second and third sources.
• Call those associations, call everyone.
• There is nothing like a personal referral.
• And keep in touch with your candidates. Most of my clients are former candidates and it makes life so much simpler.
• Treat everyone the way you want to be treated, return every single call and email.
• When you truly care about your clients’ and your candidates’ well-being, the rest will just fall into place.

I feel truly blessed to have been with such a wonderful company as Joseph Chris Partners for 15 years. We are celebrating our 40th anniversary this year and have taken many of today’s leaders in our industries through their entire careers. We have a lot to be proud of these past 40 years. Here’s to 40 more!

Written By: Claire Spence, Executive Partner

Backpacking with Mark

Mark blog

Many people struggle with what we perceive as failure at work and in our personal lives. I am no stranger to that feeling, and sometimes it can be overwhelming. As a diehard believer in achieving work-life balance, I look for activities outside of my career that refocus my energy from negative to positive. Backpacking definitely does that for me.

After a typical long weekend trip, I always feel relaxed, energized and at peace. I am able to put my life into perspective. To me, backpacking is a microcosm of life, in an emotional, physical and spiritual sense. The wilderness is my greatest passion, and spending time there reminds me of what’s most important in life.

Whether or not backpacking is your “thing”, try to find that something that you love to do, even if it is at times difficult. These things that bring us peace outside of work allow us to be more productive and effective in all areas of our life.

If you are interested in how backpacking provides me with life lessons and allows me to gain perspective, have a look at the insightful blog written by Ryo Chijiiwa below, particularly paragraph 10.

Mark Hall, Senior Partner

 

Ten Life Lessons Backcountry Backpacking Taught Me

Written By: Ryo Chijiiwa / Laptop and a Rifle Blog

“I’ve gone on a couple of solo backcountry backpacking trips, and both occasions proved to be excellent opportunities for introspection and reflection. There’s something about paring my life down to the very bare minimum and spending my time in nature that allows me to go deeply into myself, and to confront parts of myself that I otherwise might run/hide from in an ordinarily busy life. I’ve also found that backpacking in particular, of all activities, seems to have many parallels to life itself. Here are some “life lessons” that I’ve extracted while backpacking (though, I must add that these are lessons that I find myself often having to relearn).

1. It’s a process, not a destination – Backpacking is one of the relatively few activities where it’s really about the process rather than the results. That is, every minute of backpacking is backpacking. It’s backpacking when you’re walking, it’s backpacking when you stop to admire the scenery, it’s backpacking when you’re in your tent, it’s backpacking when you’re pooping in a hole, it’s backpacking when you’re cooking, it’s backpacking when you’re eating. Every minute of it is backpacking. And life is like that too, though it’s easy to forget. I think it’s easy to get into a trap of thinking like life will happen once you’ve achieved/obtained/finished this or that. But the reality is, every minute of life is life. It’s life when you’re working, it’s life when you’re playing, it’s life when you’re sad, it’s life when you’re happy. It’s life when everything seems to go wrong, and it’s also life when things go well. Every minute of our existence is life, so we should do what we can to make the most of it.

2. It’s hard, most of the time, and that’s normal – Backpacking isn’t exactly a picnic at the park. You have a heavy pack, you’re probably hot or cold, you’re dehydrated, the food isn’t great, your feet hurt, your shoulders ache, your hips are chafed, there are bugs and filth, maybe there are bears or snakes, and you’re never there yet. But if you love backpacking, you learn to accept all of this. Sure, you try to make yourself comfortable as much as possible, but I don’t think any backpacker has illusions of it generally being easy or comfortable. And once you accept that it is what it is, you barely notice the discomfort and you become more receptive to the good parts. I find that life is like that too. Life is hard. If you delude yourself into thinking that it should be peachy all the time, you will be dissatisfied, frustrated and maybe depressed most of the time, and if you’re dissatisfied or frustrated most of the time, you won’t be in a mindset to appreciate the finer moments. But if you accept that life is often hard, and things don’t always go the way you want, then it paradoxically becomes easier to accept setbacks unfazed and appreciate those good moments.

3. You need less than you think – Whenever I go backpacking, I’m struck by how little I truly need to feel happy. Water, food (and not much of it), shelter. That’s pretty much it. Sure, eventually I’ll want to bathe. Sometimes I miss human contact. But I believe it’s important to know what your needs are, vs what your wants are. Needs are things that keep you alive and physically or mentally healthy. Everything else is a want. Most things in modern society are wants. A big house? A want. A shiny new phone? A want. A nice vacation? Probably a want. The prestigious job? A want. You can tie your happiness and sense of self worth to your wants, but you don’t have to, and don’t worry, letting go of your wants won’t kill you either (that’s the definition of a want). That’s not to say that you shouldn’t get things you want. But I find that I appreciate getting what I want more, because rather than feeling like I’m getting something I’m entitled to, I can feel like I received an unexpected gift.

4. The things you carry should nourish you – You might think of backpackers as “people who walk around with big heavy packs”. And to some degree, this is true. But the point of backpacking isn’t to walk around with a heavy pack. The heavy pack is there as a necessity, so that we have what we need to keep going. That also means, though, that there’s no reason to carry things that we don’t need. In fact, many backpackers religiously reduce waste, shaving grams and ounces where ever possible. When you’re backpacking, anything you carry that doesn’t serve you in some way is basically unnecessary baggage (more on this below). In our society, I think it’s easy to think that the goal is to collect as much stuff and responsibility as we can. After all, if you have a bigger house, more money, more kids, and a fancy job title with big responsibilities, we’d probably call you “successful.” But, does that really make us happier? For some, maybe, but for others, maybe not. I think the analogy of the heavy pack is one worth keeping in mind. When you’re thinking about adding a new burden to your life, whether it’s a mortgage, or a car loan, or a child, or a fancier job, I think it’s worth asking “Is it really worth adding this burden to my life?” And if the answer is no, don’t put it in your “pack”. If whatever you’re signing up for doesn’t nourish you, it’ll just weigh you down.

5. Carry your own baggage – When you’re backpacking, you should try to be as self-sufficient as possible. Sure, if you’re with a group or with another person and you want to distribute the load, there’s nothing wrong with that. But, as a general rule, you should carry your load, and this is particular true if you have ‘baggage’ (as defined above, something you’re carrying that you don’t need). I believe this holds true in real life too. As someone who admittedly has perhaps a bigger load of historical baggage than others, this is perhaps the one lesson I struggle with most. But, it’s one I like to remind myself often, and if someday I am fortunate enough to find someone to share the load with, I would like to think that I’d be able to carry my own baggage.

6. If the spring is dry, go to the next one – When I’m backpacking in the backcountry, I rely on springs (or ponds, streams, lakes) for water. Water, of course, is absolutely necessary to survive out there, so there’s inevitably a strong emotional attachment to finding water at the springs I visit. Naturally, and especially on a draught year like this one, many springs are dry, or barely give a trickle. It’s easy to be frustrated, or maybe even be slightly panicky, but that’s just a waste of energy. If this spring is dry, the sooner I can accept that and move on, the sooner I’ll actually get to water. We find “springs” in life too, to provide things we need. Maybe it’s a dream job, maybe it’s that cute girl/guy, or a high profile gig. Whatever it is, we want it, and we want it bad because we think it’ll give us something we need. Often times, it doesn’t work out. We don’t get the job, the girl/guy rejects us, or we don’t get the gig (or if we’re having a bad day, all of the above). As upsetting as it could be, the sooner we accept that we didn’t get what we wanted and move on, the sooner we will find the job, girl/guy, or gig that does work out.

7. Know your North. Know your bearings – If you were to stop me in the woods and ask me which way was north, I’d be able to tell you. If you don’t know which way is north, you can’t navigate, and if you can’t navigate, you can’t know where you are or where you’re going. You’re lost. I’ve never gotten lost in the woods, but I’ve felt lost in my everyday life. I don’t mean ‘lost’ in the physical sense, but more in the sense that my life feels directionless and I find myself muttering to myself “I don’t know what I’m doing with my life.” Upon introspection, it usually turns out that it’s not that I don’t know what I’m doing; it’s usually that I’ve lost sight of what’s important to me — I’ve lost my True North. Once I remember what’s truly important to me, I can usually find my way back, or at least give myself a bearing to head in.

8. Enjoy the scenery – When I’m backpacking, sometimes I’ll find myself in almost a zombie-like state, where I’ll be physically walking, but my mind will be entirely self-absorbed in some thought or another. When I’m in that state, I’m not present, and I’m not seeing what’s around me. So it helps to sometimes stop, take a deep breath, set aside whatever thought is occupying my mind, and take in the scenery. Sometimes all I see is trees. But sometimes I see breathtaking beauty, and all the hard work becomes worthwhile. Life can be that way too. We can get busy living our lives, doing work, running errands, dealing with whatever mini-crisis that has struck that day. But, I think it’s good to stop occasionally, and look around, both literally and figuratively. You may notice something you otherwise might’ve missed. You might gain a different perspective. You might see the big picture, and see that you’re sweating the little stuff. Whatever it is that there is to see, you’ll only see it if you stop and look.

9. For a real adventure, go off the well-trodden paths – Paths are easy to follow without thinking. Sometimes that’s not a bad thing, if the path is taking you somewhere you know you want to go. But, when you step off the path, you need to focus on what you’re doing, and where you’re going. You need to check your progress, check your compass, scan ahead for potential hazards or openings through some thicket or perhaps a way down a rocky slope. It requires thought, focus, perception, creativity and decisiveness. It’s a richer experience than simply following a path, and it can also be hugely rewarding because you might reach a place nobody else has. We are often presented with well trodden paths in life too. Go to school, get a job, get married, buy a house, have kids… It’s all planned for you, and there’s nothing wrong with that. But if you want, you also can step off the path, and find your own way too. If nothing else, you’ll be in for an adventure.

10. Learn to fall gracefully – If you walk enough, you will fall. It’s bound to happen. Learning to fall gracefully can save you from injury or worse. Likewise, if you live fully, you will suffer failures and setbacks from time to time. Learning to handle these challenges with grace will help you ultimately be successful, because if you let a setback stop you or deter you, you’ll never get there. If you don’t learn to accept failure with grace, you also may become more fearful of taking risks, and as they say, no risk, no reward. So, take risks, fail gracefully, then try again and repeat as often as necessary.”

 

BUILDING HOMES, CHANGING LIVES

JCP+HFH2

There was a time not too, too long ago when I stayed awake at night, sometimes all night, worrying about how I was going to pay my mortgage. The stress was crippling, and almost all areas of my life suffered as a result: my health, my career, my relationships, and certainly, my happiness. Crushed under the weight of overwhelming fear, I couldn’t see a way out, and worry consumed almost all my waking hours.

Fortunately, I found an answer, and I’ve managed as a single mom to keep my daughter living in the only home she’s ever known. A safe home in a safe neighborhood, close to schools and services.

The type of insecurity I experienced is common, especially in the aftermath of the financial crisis. More than half the country, in fact, has reported that they’ve worried about how to pay the rent or mortgage and many have been forced to cut back on healthy food or medical care, or take second or third jobs, or move to unsafe, more affordable neighborhoods.

So Joseph Chris Partners’ commitment to support our Habitat for Humanity chapter here in Houston is one that is close to my heart.

The need for affordable housing hits home for many, especially as development and construction continue in our big and small cities alike. Neighborhoods that once offered affordable options for many families are transitioning into price points well above what they can afford as a result of affluent buyers increasing demand for upscale living options closer to city centers, forcing them to look elsewhere. Even here in Houston, long-touted as an affordable city, we’re seeing high-dollar development edge out families living in traditionally affordable areas of town.

And while attitudes about affordable housing development are evolving, the “Not in my backyard” or NIMBY issue remains one of the largest obstacles to offering safe neighborhoods to those struggling with the high cost of housing. If affordable housing is relegated to those areas not in anyone’s backyard, residents there who want more for their families are given little hope of providing it.

Habitat for Humanity provides that hope. Hope for home ownership. Hope for safe streets, access to key services, options for education, creation of strong neighborhoods. Through programs like the ones Habitat for Humanity offers, families are thriving.

Our first Build Day with Habitat for Humanity, Houston, is June 3rd. We’d love for our local friends and colleagues to be a part of that with us. And with a goal of $40,000 to commemorate 40th year in business, we’d certainly appreciate any donation to help us reach it.

This industry is like no other. We create beautiful spaces for people to live and work in. We grow communities and create opportunity. We transform landscapes and lives. We repurpose and reinvent and redevelop. This amazing industry has treated us well. But most of us remember when things weren’t so good. Many of us may have had sleepless nights worrying about how we were going to pay our mortgages. There are still many families who have those worries, and we all have the power to change that.

If you’d like to learn more about Habitat for Humanity, check out their website here: https://www.habitat.org/. And if you’d like to support Joseph Chris Partners and our efforts to raise $40,000 for our local chapter to build a home for one of our neighbors, you can do so here: https://app.etapestry.com/onlineforms/HoustonHabitatforHumanity/jcp.html

Written by: Angie Truitt J.D. Senior Partner

It’s that recruiter again; why you should answer the phone

April12BlogPicture

Look, we get it: you get lots of calls from recruiters, and they call at inconvenient times, and they keep calling, and you hope if you don’t answer, they’ll eventually give up.

And some do.

And with them, possibly an opportunity that could have changed your life.

Luckily, I work for a company that has a great reputation in our industry, and we’re very niched, so professionals are usually happy to hear from us, or at least willing to answer the phone when we call.

But occasionally, there’s that candidate who is irritated that they received a call from me, especially at work, and slams down the phone angrily before I finish my introduction.

And here’s what that person missed:

  •  A chance to learn about a specific opportunity I was calling about;
  •  A discussion about career goals and the options to achieve them;
  •  The opportunity to sell your own company’s brand and brag on its culture to someone who has conversations with hundreds of people every week;
  •  The ability to network with a very connected person in their industry;
  •  A discussion about what’s happening in the market, including compensation and upcoming trends;
  •  The potential to refer other professionals to someone in the industry who can help them achieve their career goals;
  •  A chance to seek help filling a tough position in their own company.

I get calls and emails from recruiters, too, and I respond to them all. Not because I’m unhappy where I am, but I realize all the chances I miss if I don’t. One persistent recruiter reached out again last week after contacting me several months ago. I promptly replied to her that things were amazing in my world, and I listed all of the reasons, but I invited a conversation to see how I could help her connect with professionals who might be interested in her role. I was able to refer some great folks to her, and, more than that, I think her takeaway was that I love my job, and I love my company, and I love working for clients in the real estate development and construction industry. Should anything come down the pipeline that’s not in her wheelhouse, but is in mine, maybe she’ll remember that happy recruiter she talked to at Joseph Chris Partners and refer me some business.

You really never know where a conversation with a good recruiter will lead you.

It might not lead anywhere at the time, but down the road, that recruiter may remember you, and may call you back about something amazing. And when that call comes, you’ll be really glad you answered the phone.

Written By: Angie Truitt, J.D., Senior Partner

Please Welcome Diana Estrada to the JCP Team!

Diana Estrada
Recruiter
281-359-2166
dianaestrada@josephchris.net

Diana Estrada joined Joseph Chris Partners as a recruiter in 2015. She worked the majority of her career in manufacturing, and through that experience, she learned dedication to her work and to getting the job done right.

Diana brings with her to Joseph Chris Partners the ability to listen to others and create new possibilities for their careers, and to solve problems for client companies. She describes herself as loyal, committed to excellence and unstoppable. Diana is dedicated to a lifetime of learning and professional growth through her own individual self-study and through the renowned Landmark Worldwide program.

In her spare time, Diana enjoys playing golf and teaching special needs children to play golf. She is also a DJ for parties and events.

Welcome to the Team!
Veronica Ramirez, CEO

Please Welcome Erika Diaz to JCP!

Erika Diaz – 281-359-2145 – erikadiaz@josephchris.net

Erika Diaz comes to Joseph Chris with over 20 years experience in the Real Estate and Construction Industry. Currently she is working as a Search Director with Joseph Chris and she brings not only the best practices from the industry, but also an outside-the-box pro-active thinking ability and style.

Erika specializes in collaborating with Corporations and Top Level Executives in creating ways to improve culture and maximize profits. Her passion lies in helping others realize their full potential in a career they love.

In her free time she enjoys spending time with her family and traveling.

Welcome to the Team!

Veronica Ramirez, CEO

Please Welcome Liz Powell to JCP!

Liz Powell
Partner
281-359-2164
lizpowell@josephchris.net

Liz joined Joseph Chris Partners as a partner in 2015. After obtaining her degree in Human Resources in 2013, she discovered her passion for recruiting, and she has placed executives across various industries, including oil and gas and real estate. Recruiting for Liz is about helping a client and candidate come together like pieces of a puzzle, which is a win-win for all and such a positive feeling. She also enjoys the fact that no search is the same and you learn something new everyday. Her prior experience in business development, marketing, human resources, and networking have set her up for success in her role as a partner. Liz describes herself as savvy, creative, and knowledgeable.

Liz has a Bachelor’s of Science in Human Resources Management from the University of Phoenix.

When Liz isn’t working, she enjoys spending time with her daughter and son, catching up with family from her home state of Indiana, taking walks, and listening to music.

Welcome to the Team!

Veronica Ramirez, CEO

Please Welcome Trish Mahoney to the JCP Family!

Trish Mahoney joined Joseph Chris Partners in 2015 after almost 15 years in education. Her teaching career enabled her to make strong connections with others, practice empathy in all situations, and demanded hard work and dedication. Trish also possesses a strong desire to help others succeed and reach their fullest potential. All of those skills have prepared Trish for a successful career in recruiting here at Joseph Chris Partners.

Trish is extremely hard working, loyal, dedicated, and positive, and manages to handle any issue while wearing a smile. She describes herself as passionate, determined, and kind.

Trish has a Bachelor’s of Science in education, and in her free time, she enjoys making memories with her two children, watching Texas Rangers baseball, enjoying BBQs with friends, camping, and when the weather keeps her indoors, watching marathons on Netflix.

Welcome to the team!

Veronica Ramirez, CEO