Pay it Forward – Inspiring the Next Generation of Industry Talent

Originally posted by Erica Lockwood as a guest blogger on Meredith Consulting’s website, March 22, 2018.

As we emerge from last week’s “Women In Construction Week” along with the observance of “International Women’s Day”, it seems quite fitting to address not only the lack of female talent present within the industry today but certainly the overall people shortage being experienced across the country. It’s a real conversation that I have just about daily with industry leaders. Reality is this is not a situation that will change overnight. But, I believe it can be transformed with focus and intention.

Recent statistics have revealed that less than 15% of the total construction industry is made up of women. While a predominantly male dominated industry, I am a believer that with the right outreach and education, we could do much more to encourage young women to consider our industry as an exciting and viable career option. The opportunities are endless and having a concerted effort to make sure young women who are considering career possibilities hear this message is vital.

I have observed a recent trend within a handful of companies where women have been promoted into leadership roles. For example, Taylor Morrison Homes has impressed me with the career advancements and the openness to provide not only leadership roles but also entry level opportunities to women in the workforce. A recent post by Taylor Morrison stated, “women make up 49 percent of our workforce, 30 percent of our executive team and Taylor Morrison is the only publicly traded homebuilder led by a woman chairman and CEO.” Talk about inspiring women to see the possibilities! Way to go Sheryl Palmer for leading that vision!

I perceive mentoring opportunities as one of the most viable avenues for awareness and outreach. Local home builder associations are typically quite involved with a variety of educational outreach programs, for instance, Junior Achievement. This program creates opportunity for discussions geared toward elementary, junior high and high school students, creating interest and spurring curiosity. I encourage our industry to be keenly focused on education and mentorship of our future leaders – young men and women alike.

Although this week had much to celebrate it also felt a huge loss as we learned of Bill Pulte’s passing. Mr. Pulte was a mentor to so many. He inspired creativity, growth and vision to so many of today’s leading industry professionals along with some of the most forward-thinking and impactful entrepreneurs I know. If each one of us might consider paying it forward in honor of Bill Pulte, we may just reach some of tomorrow’s most amazing and creative men and women industry leaders. We can all make an impact – one young person at a time!

It’s not about placements; it’s about relationships and commitment.

I can’t believe in two months I will have been with Joseph Chris Partners Executive Search for 16 years. Wow, what a ride it has been! 16 of some of the best years of my life, and still going strong.

Thinking back over those 16 years made me decide I might share what made all those years worth it for me, even during the downturn, with all of you. There are so many “recruiters” out there; some call them “Head Hunters”
( I don’t know about you, but I have never “hunted heads” in my life!). But back to my point… in general, those individuals who just throw paper at clients to see what sticks leave the rest of us with a really bad taste in our mouths.

What is it they say? KISS: “Keep it Simple Stupid”. For myself and my ilk, it’s not about making placements. Sure, we all need to eat, but I have never considered myself in sales. Our founder and former CEO used to love to argue that I was most definitely in sales, and when it comes down to it, of course that is true; but I have never in 16 years felt like I was selling anything!

When you choose the right companies to work for, and you know that company inside and out, and you truly believe in them, their culture, and consider yourself an extension of that company, there isn’t anything to sell. All that is needed is honesty and the rest falls into place. I spend face-to-face time with my clients whenever possible. I have crawled through homes under construction and put mud boots on during rainy land development days. I become a part of their team.

Many times, I have foregone placements. When I discover something, or have a feeling that something isn’t right with someone I have already presented, I will tell my clients point blank: “Hey, I know I sent this person to you, and I know you like them, but I am now letting you know that I no longer have faith in them and I am advising you not to hire him or her.” That kind of committed partnership with your clients is why most of the clients I have, I have had for going on decades, and the new ones that I get, I keep.

Same thing on the candidate side. Most of my clients started out as my candidates or came to me through referrals. I treat my clients and candidates as if they were part of my family. I know all about their spouses and children, even their pets, hobbies, and passions. I truly care about putting a company and a candidate together that will be a forever relationship. Who wants to do a replacement search? I guarantee my candidates. Fortunately, I’ve only had three replacement searches in 16 years out of hundreds of placements.

So, always keep it real, and remember to just KISS.

Our House  

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I had planned an industry-specific message for my blog this week, but tragedy struck the Joseph Chris Partners family this weekend, and I wanted to share my feelings about all of it

At 5 a.m. Saturday morning, my phone rang.  I knew something was wrong, but nothing prepared me for what I would hear when I answered that call:  through her sobs, one of my long-time JCP team members shared with shock and sadness that she’d just lost her husband.

My heart sank for her.  This employee has been with our company for over a decade. I have heard so many stories about her children’s successes, her worries, her life situations and just every-day stuff that you learn about someone working with them for as long as we’ve worked together.  She gives her all every day to make sure she does what she can to make our team successful.  She can’t sit still and is vigilant about getting the job done right, whatever that job might be.  If you need anything, she is there for you, no matter how many other responsibilities she may be juggling at the time.

She is more than just an employee; she is my family.

And I quickly realized I wasn’t the only one who felt that way about her.  After hearing the tragic news, the JCP army mobilized to help her and her own family.  Within hours, we had collected money, food, and cards filled with love to deliver to her.  Joseph Chris Partners’ reaction spoke volumes to me about the power of team.

When a situation like this happens in our house, we take action.  We not only had an outpouring of love but we also had an outpouring of support from the team.  Everyone from the most tenured in our company to the newest member of the team has rallied, volunteering to give up their vacation time so she didn’t have to worry about returning to work before she was ready, donating money and buying groceries even when they had their own financial stresses, making time for her even when time was scarce, and offering emotional support and counsel.

She is family!  She is one of us! We take care of our own! It reminded me how blessed I am to have such an incredible team.    We have togetherness.  We are family, we have unity.  We get in the trenches for one another.  Humanity… Love!  The old sayings that “no one messes with our family” and “no one stands alone” really does exude in our company.

I am so grateful to work with a group that is there for one another.

Just to be a little real and open with all of you, I do not have kids, but I have been blessed with an amazing family:  my parents, my brother’s family, my four-legged family members, and my team mean everything to me.  They are my reason each and every day that I am on a mission to perform at my best.  I wake up thinking about them, and they are in my prayers each night.

Like most bosses, I may not do everything right all the time and I could be a better leader at times, but I will stand for them always like a deep-rooted tree that will not move in the worst of bad weather.   Hopefully they know that they are part of a work family that will always be here for them.

I talk to people every day about their jobs.  I learn about what makes them happy, what keeps them in a job or what drives them to leave.  And one of the biggest influences on their happiness is whether or not they feel like they’re part of a team, whether they matter, whether the people they work with appreciate them.

And with each of those conversations, I feel more and more blessed to be working with such amazing people who care so much for each other.  And I know because we have that, we can all accomplish anything, together.

That’s how it works in our house.

And I couldn’t be prouder.

You Snooze, You Lose: How to streamline your hiring process so you don’t lose out on top talent

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I am not a morning person.  My bed is really cozy, and I keep my house nice and cold at night, so when the first of my 4 alarms goes off at 5 a.m., I snooze so I can stay in my warm and cozy bed.  And each of my four alarms is set to snooze 5 times before it stops.  And depending on how cozy I am, I may snooze for an hour, relishing the quiet 5 minutes between alarms, until I finally turn on my morning Spotify mix and start my day.

It’s a silly ritual, I realize, but it’s my morning routine, and one I’m pretty Rainman-esque about.

Until Monday of this week.

I haven’t been going to the gym like I should.  Or at all.  And I’ve always got an excuse.  I usually blame my daughter’s busy schedule, or just being tired from life in general, but the bottom line is, I just don’t want to go.  I want the results from going to the gym, like we all do, without doing the work.

So Monday I changed the paradigm.  I set my alarm for 4:00 a.m.  I didn’t snooze.  I got up, dressed, and out the door for a 5 a.m. class, and was home by 6:20, showered, and at work by my normal time of 7 a.m.

And Monday was an incredibly productive day.  Things just seemed to go my way.  It was probably just coincidence, but I’ve committed to abandoning my snoozing habit on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and getting my morning workout in.  It’ll be my new Rainman-esque routine.

Certainly, snoozing has its benefits, and no one loves it more than I do, but if you really want to get things done personally or professionally, snoozing is not the way to go.

In this candidate-driven job market, clients who hit “snooze” on a hot job search are losing out on great talent.   Some companies are used to being able to select from a myriad of wonderful professionals itching to go to work for them, but the dynamic has changed, as dynamics always do.  The pendulum has shifted once again, and while professionals will still entertain conversations about great opportunities, companies that don’t have an efficient way of moving from initial conversation to offer will likely lose out to those companies that do.

The best way to avoid losing a great addition to your team due to hiring process delays is to do the following:

  1. CREATE A HIRING TIMELINE.
    • Identify when you want this person to start working for your company. Is there are big project that they need to be in place for?  Is someone retiring and time is needed for training before the changing of the guard?
    • Decide who in your company needs to weigh in on this decision, and take inventory of scheduling issues to determine how quickly necessary interviews and pre-hiring testing can take place.
    • Working backward, tentatively schedule necessary meetings with key team members so time is reserved on everyone’s busy calendars for hiring activities.
    • After your hiring timeline is created, you can share it with your hiring partners, either internally or externally.
    • Your talent acquisition partners will then be able to tailor their search efforts to your timeline, as well as be transparent with the professionals they connect with about the process.
  2. BE RESPONSIVE WITH YOUR FEEDBACK.
    • From a branding standpoint, you need to consider the message candidates in market are receiving from the length of time it takes your hiring team to share feedback with them.
    • Commit to provide feedback on candidate resumes, interview performance or other follow up questions during the hiring process within 24-48 hours.
    • If unexpected delays occur, communicate them promptly to candidates and/or your talent acquisition partners.
  3. MAKE A FAIR OFFER.
    • It is not the time to try to save a dime on a hire. That’s not to say you should just throw money at people, but you should discuss your offer with your talent acquisition partners to ensure it’s a fair one.
    • The cost of making a lowball offer in today’s candidate centric market is high: not only will you lose the interest of the professional you’re pursuing, you will have lost the time your team invested in the job search when the candidate declines and you have to restart your search, and your brand will suffer if the professionals in your space don’t think you appreciate the value of what your team members bring to the table.
    • Listen to experts in the industry about what it takes today to get the type of talent you really need to grow your business.

There are a lot of companies competing for the same talent in our industry right now, and while the hiring process alone will not guarantee that your company will win every head-to-head battle for talent, those companies committed to efficiency and transparency in their talent searches will win over the ones who aren’t.

If your company needs help restructuring your hiring process or connecting with the right professionals to add to your team, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us here at Joseph Chris Partners.

Technology has Changed, but Good Recruiters Still Focus on the Basics: Advice From My 15 Years in Executive Recruiting

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When I started recruiting in 2002, you could call it a “whole other world” compared to recruiting today. And I honestly believe the skills that I learned back then made, and have kept, me successful all these years.

Back then, there was no LinkedIn, no Google, no Social Media, etc., to speak of. We did have a great database of candidates going back to when the company started in 1977, but other than that, you had to truly dig and hunt for candidates anywhere and everywhere. I spent a lot of time calling companies that were members of certain associations, using Biz Books for every city imaginable to find out who the top companies were in that location and industry, and trust me when I say I made 50 calls every day before noon!

It was truly “hunting” and sourcing from every place imaginable. We even had yellow pages from cities around the country. We faxed all the time and some of us were even still on dial-up internet.

I am grateful that I started before the world of Social Media and LinkedIn came. Personally, I think those things have become too much of a crutch for recruiters. I still apply the old methods today because they work. If everyone could be found on LinkedIn people like my colleagues and me would not be needed.

If I could give advice to any new recruiter today, it would be:

• Stay on the phone, use social media and LinkedIn only as second and third sources.
• Call those associations, call everyone.
• There is nothing like a personal referral.
• And keep in touch with your candidates. Most of my clients are former candidates and it makes life so much simpler.
• Treat everyone the way you want to be treated, return every single call and email.
• When you truly care about your clients’ and your candidates’ well-being, the rest will just fall into place.

I feel truly blessed to have been with such a wonderful company as Joseph Chris Partners for 15 years. We are celebrating our 40th anniversary this year and have taken many of today’s leaders in our industries through their entire careers. We have a lot to be proud of these past 40 years. Here’s to 40 more!

Written By: Claire Spence, Executive Partner

BUILDING HOMES, CHANGING LIVES

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There was a time not too, too long ago when I stayed awake at night, sometimes all night, worrying about how I was going to pay my mortgage. The stress was crippling, and almost all areas of my life suffered as a result: my health, my career, my relationships, and certainly, my happiness. Crushed under the weight of overwhelming fear, I couldn’t see a way out, and worry consumed almost all my waking hours.

Fortunately, I found an answer, and I’ve managed as a single mom to keep my daughter living in the only home she’s ever known. A safe home in a safe neighborhood, close to schools and services.

The type of insecurity I experienced is common, especially in the aftermath of the financial crisis. More than half the country, in fact, has reported that they’ve worried about how to pay the rent or mortgage and many have been forced to cut back on healthy food or medical care, or take second or third jobs, or move to unsafe, more affordable neighborhoods.

So Joseph Chris Partners’ commitment to support our Habitat for Humanity chapter here in Houston is one that is close to my heart.

The need for affordable housing hits home for many, especially as development and construction continue in our big and small cities alike. Neighborhoods that once offered affordable options for many families are transitioning into price points well above what they can afford as a result of affluent buyers increasing demand for upscale living options closer to city centers, forcing them to look elsewhere. Even here in Houston, long-touted as an affordable city, we’re seeing high-dollar development edge out families living in traditionally affordable areas of town.

And while attitudes about affordable housing development are evolving, the “Not in my backyard” or NIMBY issue remains one of the largest obstacles to offering safe neighborhoods to those struggling with the high cost of housing. If affordable housing is relegated to those areas not in anyone’s backyard, residents there who want more for their families are given little hope of providing it.

Habitat for Humanity provides that hope. Hope for home ownership. Hope for safe streets, access to key services, options for education, creation of strong neighborhoods. Through programs like the ones Habitat for Humanity offers, families are thriving.

Our first Build Day with Habitat for Humanity, Houston, is June 3rd. We’d love for our local friends and colleagues to be a part of that with us. And with a goal of $40,000 to commemorate 40th year in business, we’d certainly appreciate any donation to help us reach it.

This industry is like no other. We create beautiful spaces for people to live and work in. We grow communities and create opportunity. We transform landscapes and lives. We repurpose and reinvent and redevelop. This amazing industry has treated us well. But most of us remember when things weren’t so good. Many of us may have had sleepless nights worrying about how we were going to pay our mortgages. There are still many families who have those worries, and we all have the power to change that.

If you’d like to learn more about Habitat for Humanity, check out their website here: https://www.habitat.org/. And if you’d like to support Joseph Chris Partners and our efforts to raise $40,000 for our local chapter to build a home for one of our neighbors, you can do so here: https://app.etapestry.com/onlineforms/HoustonHabitatforHumanity/jcp.html

Written by: Angie Truitt J.D. Senior Partner

The Value of Industry Mentors

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Over the course of my executive recruiting career, I have heard countless stories related to the value of partnering with an industry mentor who provides insight, advice and feedback. I firmly believe high performing professionals in our industry have a key thing in common: there is zero tolerance for mediocrity and remaining in the safe and comfy “comfort zone”. One way to be certain that doesn’t occur is to seek out industry mentors or coaches who inspire, encourage and push personal and professional development. Partnering with the right mentor or “board of advisors” throughout the various stages of your career can make a significant impact to a professional who is coachable and an avid learner.

While some mentoring relationships happen quite naturally, the quest to identify the perfect mentor can take a bit more effort, but anything worth pursuing is rarely easy. If you have been considering seeking a mentor, here are a few thoughts for consideration:

1. “A real friend or mentor isn’t on your payroll” ~ Prince

Prince certainly had a bold but valid point in that statement. Although not always true, preferably great mentor relationships occur outside the workplace and friend zone in order to offer the most unbiased feedback and insight. A mentor who comes with no preconceived notions or thoughts can dig in and understand your needs and offer insight as to where improvements or strategy changes are needed. True growth demands the good, bad and the ugly be discussed and a mentor who desires to offer that can do so more easily if the sensitivity factor is a non-issue. After all, mentors are not meant to make one “happy”, but rather to guide to the best of their knowledge.

2. “One of the greatest values of mentors is the ability to see ahead what others cannot see and to help them navigate a course to their destination” ~ John C. Maxwell

Seeking a mentor who is respected with relevant industry experience is most productive. When considering who might fit that bill, a common mistake is going straight to the busiest, most recognized and visible mentors. This approach may work occasionally, but choosing key leaders within your industry and market might offer additional possibilities for those able to invest the time in a mentoring relationship. Consider identifying potential mentors who are functioning at a more senior level today but have been in your shoes and can easily relate to current experiences. It is with the real-life experiences – and let’s face it, mistakes – that a mentor pulls from and can offer sound advice and guidance.

3. “One person can make a difference, and everyone should try.” ~ John F. Kennedy

The ability to be 100% open and honest with a respected industry leader, who is fully committed to your personal and professional growth and success is both a unique and extremely treasured relationship. Great mentors see the overwhelming value because often they too were mentored early on and throughout their career and the experience received from that investment played a critical role in their success. Mentors see the value in directly influencing others, helping to harness unique talents and skills and even revisiting their own past lessons and hurdles. As Clint Eastwood wisely once said, “What I think the mentor gets is the great satisfaction of helping somebody along, helping somebody take advantage of an opportunity that maybe he or she did not have.”.

So, what are you waiting for? Start working toward a mentor relationship and better yet, become someone’s mentor and impart your wisdom and experiences to those who want to learn and develop. Mentoring makes a difference!

Combatting Stereotypes About Older Employees In The Job Interview Process

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In the past and somewhat in today’s market, employees over 50 are subject to inhibiting stereotypes that can bring about frustration in their current positions, and cause difficulty in securing new job opportunities. The myths about employees over 50 are that they are tired, resistant to change, technologically limited, and are unwilling to work under younger superiors, but in our research and experience there are strategic tactics to successfully combat these unfair assumptions.

For older workers, one goal of an interview is to challenge any stereotypes regarding age. Though unfair assumptions, the burden of disproving these stereotypes is unfortunately very real. But it can be done, and done effortlessly! Ultimately, it is how an older employee combats these myths while interviewing that will ensure an unbiased hiring process, and give them a fair shot at securing the position.

ASSUMPTIONS AND HOW TO COMBAT THEM HEAD ON

“Older workers are worn out…their best days are behind them.”

Show your energy and enthusiasm in the interview. Speak clearly and upbeat.Don’t groan when you sit down, nor complain about an ache or pain or previous injuries. While there is nothing naturally wrong with these actions, conducting yourself in this way will inherently create an undesirable persona of your temperament outside your professional capabilities; you only have a short amount of time to demonstrate -and confirm- to the hiring manager that you are able to get the job done, and well. Communicate about your healthy lifestyle, your exercise routine. Exercise, drinking plenty of water and eating healthy is essential to feeling good, energetic and fresh.

“Older workers are resistant to change.”

Communicate and give examples of your willingness to learn new things, your ability to adapt to new processes, systems, an acquisition, different leadership, or a change in business plan. Also, share the latest book that you have read and the importance of continuous learning in leadership, self-development, economics and your industry niche. If you have been with only one company in your career, communicate about their resistance to change if that is the case or your desire to learn from another company’s leadership. That promotes growth.

“Older workers cannot or do not want to, grasp modern technology.”

Emphasize your technological experience on your resume, and verbalize your proficiencies in the interview by providing examples of circumstances when you learned new computer or device skills on the fly, or utilized technology to solve a problem.

Take classes in new technology if you do not have a working knowledge of necessary programs. For instance, most organizations require employees to comprehend Microsoft Outlook for use. Be proactive for your future by enrolling in a user workshop, or purchase training books or get a tutor. Make time to do this.

Demonstrate a willingness to learn. You may not know everything about computers when you walk into your interview, but take comfort in knowing most individuals are in the same position. Larger companies have unique programs and databases that require employee training. Be confident, and let your interviewer know that you are willing and able to be trained. Your confidence creates certainty for others.

“Older workers are unwilling to be led by a younger manager or team.”

Explain why you want to work for the organization. If you have a strong personal connection to the corporation, leadership team and the industry it will help employers, see your sincere interest in working for the company. The more homework you take the time to do, the more likely you will form a connection with the company and the leaders.

Demonstrate a willingness to be a mentor to those with less experience. Share some examples if you feel it to be applicable. Companies that hire younger, cheaper employees can miss out on the invaluable knowledge, experience and mentoring capacities of a seasoned professional. Show your unique value by learning from and aiding your team.

We’re here to help.

In closing, companies today are growing so fast that managers do not have time to hand-hold. There is also a shortage of talent in the Industry and it appears that it will be that way for some time. The combination of today’s demographics and economic times have created opportunity for those over 50 to bring immense value to an organization. Using the tips provided will ensure the hiring managers are seeing that value and not allowing untrue and unfair stereotypes to get in the way.

If you’d like to talk with us about specific ways to help you advance in your career after 50, please give us a call!

Written by: Veronica Ramirez, President/CEO

It’s that recruiter again; why you should answer the phone

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Look, we get it: you get lots of calls from recruiters, and they call at inconvenient times, and they keep calling, and you hope if you don’t answer, they’ll eventually give up.

And some do.

And with them, possibly an opportunity that could have changed your life.

Luckily, I work for a company that has a great reputation in our industry, and we’re very niched, so professionals are usually happy to hear from us, or at least willing to answer the phone when we call.

But occasionally, there’s that candidate who is irritated that they received a call from me, especially at work, and slams down the phone angrily before I finish my introduction.

And here’s what that person missed:

  •  A chance to learn about a specific opportunity I was calling about;
  •  A discussion about career goals and the options to achieve them;
  •  The opportunity to sell your own company’s brand and brag on its culture to someone who has conversations with hundreds of people every week;
  •  The ability to network with a very connected person in their industry;
  •  A discussion about what’s happening in the market, including compensation and upcoming trends;
  •  The potential to refer other professionals to someone in the industry who can help them achieve their career goals;
  •  A chance to seek help filling a tough position in their own company.

I get calls and emails from recruiters, too, and I respond to them all. Not because I’m unhappy where I am, but I realize all the chances I miss if I don’t. One persistent recruiter reached out again last week after contacting me several months ago. I promptly replied to her that things were amazing in my world, and I listed all of the reasons, but I invited a conversation to see how I could help her connect with professionals who might be interested in her role. I was able to refer some great folks to her, and, more than that, I think her takeaway was that I love my job, and I love my company, and I love working for clients in the real estate development and construction industry. Should anything come down the pipeline that’s not in her wheelhouse, but is in mine, maybe she’ll remember that happy recruiter she talked to at Joseph Chris Partners and refer me some business.

You really never know where a conversation with a good recruiter will lead you.

It might not lead anywhere at the time, but down the road, that recruiter may remember you, and may call you back about something amazing. And when that call comes, you’ll be really glad you answered the phone.

Written By: Angie Truitt, J.D., Senior Partner

The Talent Struggles of Residential Home Builders Today Are Real

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In 2006, the economic downturn that started for Home Building in 2006 and most other industries in 2008, greatly impacted production home builders in many ways, but the impact on hiring remains even today. Between 2006 and 2012, new talent did not enter the field of home building because companies were cutting back on employees, not adding them. At the same time, many employees in preconstruction and purchasing, construction and construction management, and land acquisition and development who were caught in the early rounds of layoffs left home building for other industries and never came back.

This lapse in people entering the field combined with the layoffs that forced talent into other sectors of the industry created real problems for home builders that are hiring in today’s market. The market is robust, the demand is real, but unfortunately, so is the shortage of professionals in certain skill sets.

Obviously, we know from our high school economics class that increased demand drives costs higher, and in this case, it has resulted in new compensation structures for many home building professions. For example, purchasing professionals are consistently receiving up to 30-40% more in base pay across the experience spectrum, from purchasing agents with very little experience, all the way up to professionals with responsibilities at the corporate level.

Another area of shortage are construction management professionals, including superintendents and project managers. There were so few entering the field for so long, so there is a pronounced gap in those who have 15-25 years in the industry, and those who have less than 5 years under their respective tool belts.

The industry is in a good place right now and growing steadily. Per the National Association of Home Builders, 2016 was the best year for home building in 12 years.

What the industry needs right now requires something from both employees and employers: It requires more people willing to join this wonderful industry of home building BUT it also requires the home builders themselves to come to the realization that because we went through such a lengthy and pronounced downturn, they must step up to the plate and adjust their compensation paradigm to get the desired talent they want and need.

We at Joseph Chris Partners understand both sides of this challenging issue and are here for both our clients and candidates to help educate and further the growth of this wonderful, much needed industry.

Written By: Claire Spence, Executive Partner